How To Euthanize A Dog At Home Without A Vet?

It’s difficult to watch your best friend struggling. If only you could take the pain away… you would. The question is, would you still do it if it means putting an end to his or her life?

One of the hardest things about being a pet owner is the inevitability of having to let your pooch go one day. It is even more difficult to see him or her suffering and knowing that you cannot do anything to ease the pain.

The good news is that there is something you can do to free your dog from the pain. The bad news is that it involves letting him or her go... forever.

Euthanasia is derived from the Greek words “eu”, which means “well”, and “Thanatos”, which means death. Consequently, it's the process of relieving one from extreme suffering by intentional death. This practice is ethical among animals, in particular for those with terminal illnesses.

​Many dog owners do not want to put that “power” in the hands of other people even if they are veterinarians. Of course, you would probably want to be the one to send your dog to his or her last breath, making sure that he or she goes as peacefully as possible.

​I am not sure if it counts as good news when it means having to say goodbye to your beloved four-legged friend... but there are ways on how to euthanize a dog at home without a vet.

How To Euthanize A Dog At Home Without A Vet

​What You Will Need

Once you have made up your mind, start gathering the materials required for the painful yet peaceful send-off. Here are they:

1. Sedatives

Some of the most common anesthetics used in pet mercy killing include the following:

  • Ketamine: This is a dissociative anesthetic. It allows a patient to experience his or her body and brain separately. As a result, it has strong pain-relieving effects when combined with other drugs such as valium
  • Telazol: This sedative is a combination of tiletamine and zolazepam. The former is a dissociative anesthetic while the latter is a valium-like substance. While these two elements are not quite high on the pain-relieving aspect, they become so when combined
  • Propofol: The best thing about this sedative is that it is not widely abused. Hence, it is not an actively regulated drug, making it more accessible. The only problem is that it is more expensive than other options.
  • Medetomidine: This is a perfect pain-relieving sedative for dogs. However, it could be relatively more expensive for big breeds.
  • Acepromazine: This is the cheaper alternative for Medetomidine. Vets usually administer it on aggressive dogs. It is commonly used because it is not an abused substance.

Note that all of these drugs cause nothing more or less than deep sedation. They cannot lead to paralysis.

2. Barbiturates

Barbiturates for mercy killing are prepared in various ways. Most vets use these to overdose patients, gradually leading them to their peaceful death.​

How To Euthanize A Dog At Home Without A Vet

Procedure:

The first part of the process is the preparation. Here are the steps you need to follow:​

1. Consult Your Dog’S Vet About The Whole Process.

The only way you can get all the information you’ll need for a successful procedure is talking to an expert. Ask him or her all the questions you have about euthanasia.

More importantly, ask for his or her drug recommendations. If you have any other concerns, this is the perfect time to address them with the vet.​

2. Make The Most Out Of The Time You Have Left With Your Dog

You would not want your dog’s last days to be all about you whining about his or her upcoming demise. Be sure that amid your dog’s strife, his or her last days will be the best ones of his or her lifetime.

The key is to fill these days with great memories. Eventually, you will thank yourself for making each day count no matter how depressing they got.​

​3. Prepare yourself and your family. Simply, prepare all those closest to your dog.

Where you want the procedure to take place in your house is immaterial. The preparation is the heaviest on the emotional aspect.

You might want to spare young children involved— if there are— from witnessing the whole thing. It could be a traumatic experience for them growing up. In fact, it could be traumatic for anyone who is not emotionally conditioned.

Once you have covered the preparation, it is time for the most difficult part— the actual euthanasia. Here is how it goes:​

First Injection

As previously mentioned, there are various sedatives you can use. It depends on the recommendation of your dog’s vet.

You can administer Ketamine, Telazol, and Propofol intravenously. Most healthcare providers prefer intravenous (IV) injections because:

  • They take effect quicker than other methods of injection.
  • They are less crucial than other methods— even those who are inexperienced can perform them.

Ketamine and Telazol can be administered intramuscularly, but it can indeed hurt your dog. It is mostly a case-to-case basis.

​On the other hand, you cannot give Propofol through intramuscular (IM) injections.

​Unlike Propofol, Medetomidine and Acepromazine are mainly administered intramuscularly. However, Acepromazine may sting through such method. Alternatively, you can administer it intravenously.

​Regardless of the method, the most important thing is that you deliver the drug in the right dosage as a pain-relieving sedative. The goal of the first injection is to sedate your dog heavily.

How To Euthanize A Dog At Home Without A Vet

Second Injection

This involves the IV injection of anesthetics as an overdose. This is where barbiturates get in, paving the way for the fast onset of your dog’s cardiac arrest. Usually, it occurs within just a minute after drug administration.

Note that postmortem movements are healthy for all living beings. Do not be shocked nor worried when your dog moves following cardiac arrest.

It does not mean that he or she is experiencing pain. It also does not indicate that the procedure has failed. It is just the last, remaining electrical impulses after your dog’s brain has shut down.

When your dog has finally breathed his or her last, it is up to you whether you want a funeral or not. For some people, having a funeral service helps them cope up with the loss. Knowing that their beloved dogs are resting in peace and free from all suffering is somehow worth celebrating amidst the pain.

​When your dog has finally breathed his or her last, it is up to you whether you want a funeral or not. For some people, having a funeral service helps them cope up with the loss. Knowing that their beloved dogs are resting in peace and free from all suffering is somehow worth celebrating amidst the pain.

​On the other hand, a simple burial is enough for some people. It could be a lot to take in but being able to bid goodbyes properly eases the internal weight.

To Wrap Things Up...

Now that you know how to euthanize a dog at home without a vet… are you still having doubts? That’s normal.

You can always think about your decision over and over again. Performing the mercy killing could have long-term psychological and emotional effects on you… so you must be 100% ready.

Should you go for it, keep in mind that you need to:

  • Consult your dog’s vet.
  • Make each remaining moment count.
  • Prepare the people closest to your dog.
  • Administer the right drugs in the right dosages.

Whatever decision you come up with, it is important that you are only doing what is best for your dog. As a pet owner, it is your responsibility to put his or her needs first.

How To Euthanize A Dog At Home Without A Vet?

Are you going through this tough decision-making process today? Share your struggles with us and let us know how we could help you out. Or have you gone through it before? We would love to hear your courageous experiences.

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Jennifer Wood
 

Hi there, my name is Jennifer Wood, founder of Eforpets.com - a great resource for pets lovers.

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